The video installation that let us go to Paradise (and Hell): Infinite Garden

The video installation that let us go to Paradise (and Hell): Infinite Garden

Until 2 October the Museo del Prado, with the sole sponsorship of Fundación BBVA, will be presenting an ambitious video installation based on Jheronimus Bosch’s iconic painting The Garden of Earthly Delights. Specially designed for Room C of the Museum, it offers a close-up experience of the celebrated triptych in a sensory and perceptual environment through which the viewer moves and shares space with the Earthly Paradise, the Garden of Earthly Delights and Hell, accompanied by a multitude of figures, creatures and bodies.

The videoinstallation joins the celebrations for the 5th centenary of the death of Jheronimus Bosch which representing an unrepeatable opportunity to see a remarkable group of works comprising the eight original paintings by the artist to be found in Spain together with others loaned from collections and museums around the world.

In Infinite Garden, artist Álvaro Perdices and filmmaker Andrés Sanz dissect the multiple pictorial worlds of Bosch’s work through a total sensory experience that is in turn wrapped in a soundscape composed by musicians Santiago Rapallo and Javier Adán. Infinite Garden comprises a multi-projection on 18 video channels of a video and audio work lasting 75 minutes and accompanied by 16 soundtracks. The installation’s creators have reinterpreted and reconstructed images from The Garden of Earthly Delights in order to offer a completely new work.

This new video installation by Álvaro Perdices and filmmaker Andrés Sanz includes an original soundtrack composed for it by musicians Santiago Rapallo and Javier Adán. Infinite Garden has been conceived to create a totally immersive atmosphere which allows spectators to enter Bosch’s famous triptych through a perceptual space, moving around the Earthly Paradise, the Garden of Earthly Delights and Hell in the company of numerous figures, creatures and bodies.

Infinite Garden dissects, breaks up and reassembles details from the painting’s multiple pictorial worlds, generating a totally sensory space that is in turn wrapped in a soundtrack with three-dimensional elements. The fragmented images, changes of scale and surprising micro-narratives take on a new dimension, producing the same type of amazement that Bosch’s work has always aroused. These fragmented details together create a journey through the world of “significant detail” which both fascinates and frustrates due to our inability to grasp in its entirety a spatial
arrangement that dissolves the object in the experience.

 

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